Tuesday, September 28, 2021

A Bounty Of Hours

 I was sitting at the computer this weekend, plugging away on yet another spreadsheet.  In this case it was trying to make an estimate of available hours.

Although I continue to have Job Nervousness (here and here), none the less at this point in the program it makes absolutely no sense to leave my current position unless 1) I am kicked out; 2) I retire (highly unlikely, but an option); or 3) They so change my job role and (more importantly) my salary that it makes no more sense for me to be there.  That said, I am thinking about methods to supplement my income.  A second job - one that a) involves a little more physical activity; and b) is of the engagement level that I do the work and not have to think excessively would fill the bill.

(Why?  Frankly, I would like more of an allowance to travel to Japan when that gets started again and I do not want money to ever be the reason I cannot go).

As a result, I began to work with my schedule, trying to arrange it such that all my current activities and studies did not fall off into having no time allocated and seeing what chunks of time I might have available.

I was absolutely stunned when I was finished.

By my count, the process of rearranging my schedule and keeping my activities and interests ongoing and working and getting what is effectively my sleep pattern, I can have 18% of my weekly hours (30.75 hours for those, like me, that struggle with math in your head) available.

That includes all my Iaijustu training, my "real" job, volunteering for the rabbits, and Sunday mornings allocated for God. 

Yes, that is enough time for a second job (if I decide that makes sense).  But that is also enough time to do any number of things:  Learn a new skill.  Master a skill I am learning.  Good heavens, go get another degree or certificate.

The placement of the time was interesting as well.  I have large chunks of time - 3 hours at least 4 days a week and a huge chunk - 6 hours - on Saturday afternoon.

Does that mean I have to fill every hour?  Of course not.  One needs to leave some manner of space for the unanticipated or unexpected.  But what it does mean is that I have a lot more available time that I thought I did, if only I will use it wisely.

And time, after all, is the stuff of life.

16 comments:

  1. Living deliberately. You are making that pretty clear, and now I'm wondering about what I can do.... Thank you.

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    1. StxAR, you have said in two words what it took me a whole post to write.

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    2. To my mind, the essence of elegance is making something as simple as possible, but no simpler. Those two words don't have the depth of your explanation that made your post a reference document. I wrote the tag, you wrote the article.

      As to the Samurai Guest Ranch, there are riders to insurance for short term use, and if you do a quarterly meet up, It would be an amazing long weekend of training, like Berzerker weekend. I did similar weekends when I was studying 7 Star Praying Mantis kung fu back in the day. Travel from Houston to deep east Texas. We'd meet at homes and work for two days on forms and testing. It was rewarding and we went in knowing we were on our own recognizance.

      Another group developed out of that. We spent time in the east Texas swamp learning 'skills' from "been there done that" folks, that might or might not make good reading in a fiction story or two some decades later....

      Skills were learned, and put in the mental tool box for later. Thank God I made that investment...

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    3. STxAR - You flatter my words sir, thank you very much.

      The idea of a "guest ranch" is one I have noodled on from time to time, and your idea has a ring to it. There are insurance riders of course and almost anything is possible, with a little thought.

      The great thing about any education is as long as you have the mind, you have the skills or knowledge.

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  2. You were talking about turning the ranch into a great big dojo for smelly samurai and ninjas, weren't you? Have you ever pursued that thought all the way TB? I think that'd be an awesome way forward if it is indeed viable. Even better if you could open something like that up to the kids too...

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    1. Ed, it has been a consideration. The only thing arguing against it is the location - it is pretty out of the way and thus would not be a sustainable endeavor from the local point of view. I would have to go "down the hill" to find a sufficient student population.

      Plus, the liability...

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  3. My wife looks at time like you do. I do not. I need time for nothing. It doesn't mean I'm actually doing nothing, but having no commitments frees up my mind and recharges my internal batteries. Nothing drains me further than looking at a calendar and realizing all the things I'm obligated to do. For me, trying to fill up those 30 hours even partially with some other form of obligated work would just completely drain me and probably make me worse at my bread and butter job.

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    1. Ed, while I do enjoy my recharge time, I am finding that without some planning and simply seem to fritter my time away on things that neither add value nor really improve my life. Not that everything has to improve my life or add value, but looking at the better part of a weekend and realizing another week of work has rolled around and I seem to have nothing to show for it is a bit concerning.

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  4. Don't waste your time on "another degree or cert." those will be obsolete in the near future. Stick with learning something useful that will also be enjoyable. Trust me, I'm a not dead old guy(my credentials).

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    1. TM - Your credentials are impeccable.

      At least for my current career (until such time as it is not), certificates are the way of advancement (and cheaper than a degree). For the degree - other than vanity - there is a certain reward I find in structured learning that I have troubles achieving in self study. The nature of a class gives it a certain incentive - I was always good with the structure of school.

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    2. My boss told me to go back to school, after I was put out of the running for a promotion due to not having a degree. Never mind the 27 years of telecom experience I had, the kid with the 2-year degree and ZERO experience was "more qualified." I told my boss "Do the math. I'm 50 (at the time). So I go to school and get that 2-year degree. I also pick up the debt. Somewhere down the line I MIGHT get another chance at a promotion. It's not worth it." It wouldn't have been, either. There have been no other chances for promotion out of my spot since then. I'm 60 now, pushing 61. ...I'm gettin' too old for this stuff...

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    3. Pete, I definitely hear you. Lots of industries - my own included - have a "degree" bias to the point that even those positions that do not require degrees need them. I have told my daughters many times that I am not all that concerned about how they do in college, only that they graduate as 90% of places one will be hired care not a whit for grades.

      Honestly, depending on the industry, that is what makes certifications more attractive. Much cheaper, defined body of knowledge, and generally they have an agreed upon value across industries - not the case where many can have a B.A. but not all B.As are created alike.

      Honestly, any education or degrees I would be seeking at this point would be purely for my own benefit.

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  5. In your spreadsheet, did you allocate time to enjoy your marriage and family?

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    1. Judy, I actually did include some time for that in the form of regular set asides that we typically do together. In some ways, at least as a marriage unit, we do a fair amount of activities separately, so there does not seem to be an extensive change at least on paper.

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  6. I vote for finishing something you are already learning, or however you put it.
    Degrees are overrated, or so says Mike Rowe, if I remember right. The learning of a trade that can bring you money (blacksmithing was it? or knife making?) now or later is a good thing.

    You all be safe and God bless, TB.

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    1. Linda, you do remember correctly! It was blacksmithing - and, as it turns out, I will get my second class next month.

      I have been playing it through and it seems likely that it will be as you say. There are adjustments we can make at home financially before a degree or even another job make sense.

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