Tuesday, March 09, 2021

On The Finishing Of Buying Of Things

Last night I made essentially my last purchases beyond needs (and books) for quite possibly the rest of my life.

The purchases themselves were pretty minor - two of my beloved "Gamma World" Miniatures by Grenadier (circa 1980) and a couple of sword maintenance items (Choji oil - mineral oil scented with cloves - and a tool for removing the hibaki, or sword collar).  There is a modern Japanese Print that I want to procure next month simply because it pleases me.

And after that, there is nothing on my list.

Part of it is simply that I have reached the limit of things that I can actually have - yes, there is always more that I can desire but truly, do I have the room for it or the time to enjoy it?  The other part is simply the realization, especially after coming back last week from The Ranch, that there is a point at which stuff becomes too much.

I have a list, of course, of items that will be necessities, both one for here at New Home and one at The Ranch, and whether here or there will need to be procured.  And a continuing list of supplies and handy things to have in the event that, say, the electricity and water somehow magically go away (I understand that happens in certain places).

But those are relatively minor things in the scope of the whole picture.  If the economy is looking for a recovery from me, they will be hard pressed to find it.

It is rather odd - having made the decision that I have reached that point, I find it rather freeing.  There is no sense that I am "limited", but rather that like with any other activity, I am done.

It has yielded a rather surprising sense of relief.  And indirectly, of money.

13 comments:

  1. Very interesting. This requires some deep cogitating....

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    1. STxAR, just to be clear I am not saying I will not, never, buy anything again. That is just impossible. And I am not saying that, for example, I will not be buying books again - I am, except on a planned and regulated schedule.

      What I am saying is that in terms of my wants and activities, I have realized that I have reached outer limits of what I need or will use. And realizing that, I am making the decision that "enough is enough". Oddly enough, this is the sort of thing that does not endear itself to a consumer and service based economy.

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    2. I understood this was the direction you were working toward. I've just been in a thinking exercise lately meself. I would see an item being utilized, realize that I would be there soon, and find the best deal on it. I ran out of those last year... I'm pretty good now on tooling for what I can foresee needing.

      Recently, I started a paid project, and have been buying parts for that endeavor. I noticed immediately, that I was avoiding buying any personal geegaws. I am focused on finishing this to get the filthy lucre it promises. But when it comes to buying parts, I don't think twice about it. I need it to complete the job.

      Your post brought that into razor sharp focus, calling into question the previous few years....

      Very timely post, old man. Very timely, indeed!

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    3. Also, I lay a card down face up: I do NOT believe in co-incidents. I have seen too often a person I can relate to have an issue, and it be quite close to my own. I get insight that way. I believe the Creator is directing me that way. Of course, it has to line up with His Word to pass muster. I don't just blow with the wind, so to speak.

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    4. STxAR - Same here. I will buy things, for example, to support my Sword Training - but that is because it is necessary for the craft and important to me. But the add-ons - the "gee-gaws" you refer to - have largely fallen to the wayside.

      Maybe God is doing something in both of our lives, friends!

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  2. I have for the most part, spent most of my adult life only buying needs and saving up money. I do plan at some point to buy things I don't need but I suspect they will mostly come in the form of experiences and not physical items.

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    1. Ed, I think that for many experiences replace the "things" of youth. Certainly The Ravishing Mrs. TB loves to fill her life with the experiences of travel (myself, I am more of a homebody).

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  3. I reached that point a while back myself, TB, and that' saying something coming from a guy whose hobby is hitting yard sales every weekend! I still hit the sales, but I'm very discriminatory about what I buy. If I don't have an immediate or recurring need for something, it stays on the table. "Fixers" are no longer appealing to me. I can see now why older folks "downsize." They simply don't need the stuff, and don't want to maintain it anymore. That's the biggest thing for me; the maintenance. Everything you buy becomes something you need to maintain. It has to be run, tested, oil changed, repaired, stored; you name it. Let it go to far, and it becomes a "god" you serve. I'm to the point where I want more God, and less clutter!

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    1. Pete - Agreed. Maintenance and care is the standing joke of my Sensei and myself - when sword maintenance becomes an afternoon filling activity, you may have too many swords!

      I do think that you are also correct in terms of downsizing. It is not an original thought with me, of course, but the division between generations on the question of "stuff" has become very noticeable. Mind you, in some cases it is not warranted: I look at the antique furniture my parents own and find it light years away from the IKEA furniture that will only last a few years (and my parents still has at least or more value than it did), but that is rather the exception than the rule, I suspect.

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  4. I said that awhile back and have been somewhat true to it. I rebarrelled a beloved old rifle, and renewed my club memberships... and buy nickel and dime stuff for my farts n' crafts. But... I thank my Maker from the deepest depths of my soul that I am not in debt or owe anyone anything.

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    1. Agreed Glen, you have been a model of efficient spending. And that is not to say I would not do the same, in certain circumstances - Sure as I say I will not do it, if a "deal" on a new sword came around I would probably look at it. But that is an interest for something I use, not just "buying" to buy.

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  5. A good read here. Congratulations, TB.

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