Saturday, October 23, 2021

The Silent Voice Of Economics

One of things that I have found as I have continued to learn to be silent is that economics will often do the speaking for me.

Economics is a thing which impacts everyone to a greater or lesser extent.  It is very noticeable.  And the fact of the change or difference cannot be argued with.  Why the change happened is, of course, subject to discussion, but not the fact of it.

A simple example:  the price of fuel.

When I return or speak with folks in Old Home, the price of fuel comes up.  "What is the price of gas now?" the question will come.  I will give the response.  There is a moment of silence, as both I and the questioner know that they are paying more.  There are reasons they are paying more, reasons that they will typically not bring up into discussion.  But the impact on their pocket book is a reality that neither of us need to dwell on at any length.

It extends to a great many things these days.  The price of food.  The fact that your meal or your work may be delayed as businesses are having problems finding employees.  The fact that some things may be completely unavailable or take exceedingly long periods of time. 

The reality that, at least now, it seems almost everything is more expensive.

There are reasons for this of course.  Economics (and supply chains) do not happen in a void.  Decisions are made by governments in what they choose to tax or not tax (and thereby encourage or not encourage), what they choose to encourage or discourage.  And the market reacts accordingly.

I expect that as we continue to move into Winter and what appears to be increasingly unstable economic times, these sorts of things will become even more obvious and harder to not see.  And I say "not see" specifically:  At some point even children begin to put together simple logic chains like when it is cloudy, it is more likely to rain.  At some point, as shortages move on and prices increase (and quite likely never come down), even the most resistant will at least have to look at their far more dwindling resources that go faster and faster for less and less.

At some point, economics becomes rock upon which all societies, cultures, and peoples either break or restore themselves.

14 comments:

  1. All of it is actually no surprise to anyone who paid attention to the past decisions, philosophical leanings, and future goals of our current rulers. Unfortunately, it's the sad price we're paying for choosing personality over policy.

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    1. Agreed, Leigh. And, of course, not really teaching economics the way we should.

      Delete
  2. HAR! HAR HAR HAR! HAR HAR HAR HAR HAR!!!

    Ahhhhhhh.

    HAR HAR HAR HAR HAR!!!πŸ˜‚πŸ‘

    You don’t know anything about socialists and lefties, do ya? I’m sorry - I shouldn’t laugh.

    But no, TB… you will never tell these guys, “I told ya so!”. They will never say, “Gee, I guess ol’ TB was really right about this, and I was wrong about that…”.

    The reason they are bled dry is evil One Percenters. The reason they live in poverty is privileged white people. The reason they got Covid is the unvaxxed. Nothing is ever their own fault, when bad things happen to them, it’s because evil people are magically oppressing them. If it weren’t for guys like you - we could have unlimited free healthcare, even for the swarming migrants and immigrants going on the system that never paid into it. Free education. Utopia.

    Enjoy this, TB, because you will probably never hear it again:

    “Maybe TB is right about keeping silent, and I am wrong in trying to point out the obvious to the oblivious…”

    πŸ˜†πŸ‘

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    1. Maybe not, Glen. Surely like with every revolution, there is a committed core. But there are a great deal of people whose lives will mysteriously be impacted by these increases.

      Sometimes it is best to help others to find a star not by telling them where to look, but where to look near.

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  3. I blame "the powers that be" and the rich people behind them.
    You all be safe and God bless, TB.

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  4. It is hard to stay positive with all that is going on, especially when the rich are getting richer, and the rest of us are getting hefted with the bill. I can only turn to the Universe/ God and ask that all will be sorted out eventually. If I did not have that faith then I would indeed be in a mental and emotional vacuum, much like most of the people here.

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    1. Vera, it is hard to stay positive. I completely agree.

      I have a friend whom posts a great deal on Social Media. In one recent discussion, I made a comment that I am not posting nearly as much as I used to. Her response was that it was up to us to be the positivity on Social Media in our small way. I think in some way, if nothing else, we can do that much. Or at least try to.

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  5. The official line that is being trotted out is either:
    a) This is all signs of greatness
    or
    b) You are not seeing what your eyes are telling you you are seeing

    The bugeaters love this, and they will blame their pain on you.

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    1. Just So, you are exactly correct. I have heard both over the last few weeks. Which is fine, because the more it is said, the more people get to compare what their eyes and pocketbooks are telling them versus what they are being told. That sort of discrepancy, over time, can be dangerous for any regime.

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  6. Energy prices are a universal tax on every physical item. And when prices of energy go up, freedom (generally) declines.

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    1. Indeed John. It seems most people do not realize how much every single thing they touch is touched at more than one point by energy of many kinds: raw material capture, manufacturing, shipping, delivery.

      I had not thought of the relationship between the price of energy and the declination of freedom, but upon further thought you are exactly right.

      Thanks for stopping by!

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  7. I could never tell you the value of a gallon of gas or milk at any given moment. I honestly just don't pay attention. Mostly it is because I am not a large consumer. My daily commute is measured in small fractions of a gallon of fuel and I am going to buy that gallon of milk as long as we use it. Those that I know who are concerned about those things are typically much bigger consumers of both.

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    1. Usage does play a factor Ed. I notice gas prices a great deal less now that I commute a great deal less as well. But in the back of my mind, I remember how everything is moved at some point - several points - by gas.

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  8. Size of family also counts. We need to shop more often. We tend to buy only once a week or so, and that's when the prices really hit us. As I was telling a friend tonight, other than 4 quarts of oil for one of our vehicles, over $200 for a family of four adults.

    The worst part is knowing the economy will probably never be good again. Unless more people turn to God.

    You all be safe and God bless!

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